Thursday, December 31, 2015

} // good to go

Okay, let's see what we've got. Two sets of annotated training materials. Six books. Over four dozen online videos. Some 80 articles, interviews, and academic papers. A slew of blog entries, and more posts to Usenet and StackOverflow than you can shake a stick at. A couple of contributions to the C++ vernacular. A poll equating my hair with that of a cartoon character.

I think that's enough; we're good to go. So consider me gone. 25 years after publication of my first academic papers involving C++, I'm retiring from active involvement with the language.

It's a good time for it. My job is explaining C++ and how to use it, but the C++ explanation biz is bustling. The conference scene is richer and more accessible than ever before, user group meetings take place worldwide, the C++ blogosphere grows increasingly populous, technical videos cover everything from atomics to zero initialization, audio podcasts turn commute-time into learn-time, and livecoding makes it possible to approach C++ as a spectator sport. StackOverflow provides quick, detailed answers to programming questions, and the C++ Core Guidelines aim to codify best practices. My voice is dropping out, but a great chorus will continue.

Anyway, I'm only mostly retiring from C++. I'll continue to address errata in my books, and I'll remain consulting editor for the Effective Software Development Series. I may even give one more talk. (A potential conference appearance has been in the works for a while. If it gets scheduled, I'll let you know.)

"What's next?," you may wonder. I get that a lot. I've spent the last quarter century focusing almost exclusively on C++, and that's caused me to push a lot of other things to the sidelines. Those things now get a chance to get off the bench. 25 years of deferred activities begets a pretty long to-do list. The topmost entry? Stop trying to monitor everything in the world of C++ :-)

Scott


141 comments:

  1. I attended a talk you gave on c++ in London many years ago that was better than any book or video and which helped me decide a career in programming was one I wanted to pursue.

    I'll miss your tutelage, but look forward to seeing what you do next.

    Thank you.

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  2. Your keen insights will be missed. Hope the «mostly retiring» bit means we'll still profit from them on occasion. Happy semi-retirement!

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  3. Well, your 'effective' books and materials and all will be missed; yes, there is a lot of available info all over the internet, but the more one can find, the less you can find that is well written and organized.
    I do regret your decision, but hey, enjoy whatever you do next, as much as I know I enjoyed your books. Thanks a lot for your work

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  4. I will miss you Scott. The books and articles you wrote are the masterpieces and helped many of us in becoming better programmers.

    I wish you all the best for your future work and look forward to know what's next.

    With Best Regards

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  5. Seeing your work was always a delight. It's sad to think I won't get to see one of your talks in person, and I won't have a new Effective book to read. My hope would be that you would change your mind, but I'm sure you've made a well-considered decision.

    Thank you for all you've done. I wish you the best in all your endeavors.

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  6. Thank you for all your work on C++ -- and best of luck in the future!

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  7. Your C++ work is top notch! Sad to see you out of the "field", but good luck with all future projects!

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  8. Right time... We need Effective Haskell book series! ;)

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  9. Thank you for all your work, Scott!
    Happy New Year!

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  10. How about Effective Rust... that should be a hit

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    Replies
    1. Yes! This!

      Of all the languages mentioned in the comments, this one seems like the only one with design goals similar enough to those of C++ for Scott to feel at home and for his C++ experience to be a major benefit. Plus, it's one of the few languages I think C++ lovers could come to love just as much or more and which could potentially serve the same needs. And, well, I'm just really excited by Rust, and I think it can do some serious good for the industry, and if Scott wrote a book about it maybe that would help it take off.

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  11. Truly the end of an era. Your books made a true impact on countless programmers around the world. I remember the first heady, frightening days of my C++ journey 18 years ago, and Effective C++ was a beacon of hope that I clutched onto for dear life!

    Maybe you're sick to death of writing, but I hope you continue to do so in whatever field you turn your talents to next!

    Thank you and best wishes for all your future endeavors.
    Mike

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  12. One guess ...

    Move semantics was the last straw.

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  13. Among all the (good) resources that we have today your book "Effective Modern C++" still stands out. Nowhere else can you find a guide that covers all the *relevant* stuff with this level of quality (where each chapter has been carefully been enhanced and reviewed by other experts).

    I feel sad about this :(

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  14. I got my start with C++ about 25 years ago with Walter Bright's compiler (Zortech). Your first book stands out in my memory the most. In those early days of the internet having a good book really meant a lot :)

    Many thanks for everything you've done over the years to make C++ a better and brighter place.

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  15. Thank you for all your work with making C++ understood. Enjoy what ever you do next.

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  16. Thank you for all your work with making C++ understood. Enjoy what ever you do next.

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  17. Is it already april?

    Madness! Madness I say!!

    Cats and dogs are going to live together. Is it that, what you want? ;-)


    Seriously, Scott, thank you for what you have done.
    And if there is a slight chance of you being back for, let's say "Effective C++17"... we will welcome you with open arms!

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  18. C++ will definitely be strong in 2016 and onwards.
    Hats off to you sir.

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  19. So long, and thanks for all the fish.

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  20. Bravo!

    Applause.

    Not long ago, a Scott Meyers submission came up on HackerNews, and I almost posted a comment along the line sof, "why is Mr. Meyers *still* interested in this C++ cruft? Is he going to think and write about insipidities like nullptr for the rest of his life?"

    About time, Mr. Meyers.

    I wish you, into the new year, a cascade of exciting upgrades to your programming-language-related interests.

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  21. I dig the hair. Don't change for anyone. I'm counting four Meyers books on my shelf. Enjoy those other things you've been meaning to get to.

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  22. I've been reading your books since before I started college in 1993. Now that I'm running my own software company your books are always my first recommendation for new recruits. You've had a significant impact on the community that simply can't be measured.

    Wishing you luck in whatever comes your way.

    Thanks for all the fish.

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  23. see you in the javascript world ;)

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  24. Thanks for all the great book and talks. Your books helped turn a generation of "C with classes" programmers into modern C++ programmers. There is a lot of better C++ code out there in the world, because of your teaching efforts.

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  25. Thank you Scott. Your work has helped me significantly over the year. Much appreciated. Happy new year to you.

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  26. Please take a look at Kotlin (https://kotlinlang.org/) and let us know what you think, it's a really promising language.

    Best of luck to you!

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  27. Your work made a huge influence. Thank you Scott!

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  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  29. You opened a whole new world of C++ to me... Sorry to hear you are going...

    Best of luck for your future endeavors...

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  30. I have always looked forward to your online presentations. Those were a great source of learning for me and at the same time entertaining. If you had already decided to go on this path, you SHOULD have given atleast one talk at cppcon 2015 :)
    Your effective series have for sure made a 'lot' C++ programmers better at their job.
    Wishing you all the best for your future endeavours and do keep us posted on whatever you are upto, We C++ programmers would still be excited for sure :).

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  31. Thought I haven't done much with it lately (last two decades), C++ was my favorite language from around 1987-1993. I even wrote a complete, single pass, C++ preprocessor and parser in lex and yacc. Well, complete except for that ambiguous situation that couldn't be expressed in an LALR(1) grammar. I hear C++ has gotten more complicated since.

    I remember your first book, Scott, and the wonder I felt upon the first reading (there were a few). I also remember spreading the word and telling fellow programmers they needed to buy and read it. I remember books. Fondly.

    Thank you, Scott!

    Best wishes with what's next.

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  32. Without Effective C++ I would probably not be programming C++.

    Good luck and joy with whatever you plan to do in the future!

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  33. Thank you for all the hard work you've done! Good luck with your future plans!

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  34. D language needs you. :)

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  35. First impression I had was "you are moving to go (lang)" :) nevertheless you will be missed by many real programmers. I had an opportunity to interact with you regarding chapter 10 of more effective c++ of yours. You are rare of the rarest.

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  36. First impression I had was "you are moving to go (lang)" :) nevertheless you will be missed by many real programmers. I had an opportunity to interact with you regarding chapter 10 of more effective c++ of yours. You are rare of the rarest.

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  37. Thank you Scott for your dedicated and invaluable work. Best of luck for your future!

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  38. Thanks for all your effort in C++. You definitely left your foot print.

    And you are right, your are leaving the C++ language (community) at a time where it has an all time high.

    I wish you all the best for your new project.

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  39. Good luck on your new career direction. It feels a bit like Columbus going out of navigation :) Are you going to stay active in the software consulting business? And perhaps focusing on broad themes like performance, better UIs, and overall software development best practices?

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  40. Thanks for everything that you have done!

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  41. What about a "Goodbye C++, and welcome X" speech? =)

    (X would be "the new thing" you'd be working on.)

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  42. Thanks so much for all of your work. I loved 'Effective C++' - it taught me a lot.

    Good luck to you in everything you do!

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  43. Thank You for flawless improving of C++ world for 25 years.

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  44. Thank you very much for sharing your sharp mind with us

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  45. What about Ruby... We badly need you helping us improve its performance.

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  46. How will I live without your new books... sob-sob...
    I become a C++ programmer mostly with help of your works.
    Thank you.
    Hope someday we will see another effective book)

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  47. Thanks for all your good work on C++, I really learnt a lot from all your material.
    I hope you will keep us posted on this blog about your future projects. :)

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  48. Next stop..
    Effective Scala and R

    Please. Please. Please.

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  49. Thank you. "Effective C++" is one the most useful books in my library.

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  50. I recently re-entered the C++ programming world. First book to buy was your Effective C++, which I used many years ago. It was a joy to re-purchase, knowing the value.

    Thank you for your passion & devotion & strong desire to communicate with regular people. Best of luck going forward!

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  51. Off all the C++ sessions I've attended yours were always the most memorable. It is good to be able to move on knowing you helped put something in a place were it can grow in your absence.

    Thanks Scott

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  52. Does anyone know what we should be doing to find jobs as C++ programmers? Would appreciate any advice.

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  53. We'll miss you :( Thanks for your great contribution on C++ and Effective Software development series books. You are the one who set the path for such great series which improves programmes and helped them to understand the technology better. Thank you

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  54. Best of luck Scott. Thanks for showing me how C++ actually works with Effective C++ back in 199-something-or-other. Thanks for visiting Creative Assembly and uploading your last book into our hungry brains. I hope everything is fantastic for you in the coming years.

    Cheers,
    Guy

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  55. It has been a decade since I worked in C++, but the things I learned from you in C++ helped with languages later in my career. Thanks for that.

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  56. The end of epoch...
    Honestly, it's very sad to hear, that such world class top notch expert retires from C++. Myself same as other millions of developers grew up and became much better on your books, talks and blogposts. We all will miss you a lot, Scott. Thank you very much for your excellent work during so many years.
    Happy New Year and all the best with your new projects!

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  57. Well, you are my best author of C++ so i dont like the idea of cant get any more books or watch any more videos from you but if it is the time good luck, i appreciate what you did for the C++ comunity

    I want to wish you the best and a happy new year

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  58. Well thanks Scott for the knowledge you have passed on, and the gentle humour in your writing which i've always enjoyed. Your efforts to educate have been heroic, and appreciated by all. Now start on that backlog of other things, and don't spend 25 years on the second item on the list otherwise you'll have even more to sort out by the time you get to item 3 ;-)

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  59. Effective Haskell? Love to see a proper low level introduction interfacing with C and the OS.

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  60. I still have the first edition of your Effective-C++ books, but I have abandoned C++ way longer ago :)

    So... please come back to Python now, will you?

    Best regards and happy new year!

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  61. Thank you Scott! Please be aware of the positive change you have made in the world, allowing people to be more effective with their creations and tackling the complexity of the language. We will miss your work but we look forward to hear from your new creations as well. Happy New Year!!

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  62. Thanks Scott. You're a legend. I hope you reconsider your decision or at least consider explaining Haskell :)

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  63. Congrats, Scott! Looking forward to seeing where your To-Do list takes us next. Rock on. Thank you for the knowledge (and hair). Cheers!

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  64. Man sorry to see you leave the world of C++. There may be a ton of other materials out there but they aren't a 1/10 as clear as your writing.

    Anyway I'm looking forward to see what you come up with next. Do something on Rust!

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  65. Thank you for 25 years of incredible service to the open source and programming community.

    I read your book at the outset of my programming career. It was the clearest thing I ever read on C++ by a long way.

    OTOH, if, like me, you had switched to Python, you could have retired 5x faster ;-)

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  66. Have an Effective Retirement! You'll be missed.

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  67. @Everybody: Thanks very much for your kind words. Had I known that retiring from C++ would have led to so many nice comments, I'd have done it years ago :-)

    Those of you hoping for Effective [Language of Choice] may get what you're looking for, but it won't come from me. I'm languaged-out, at least for a while. Fortunately, there are lots of other people with technology-specific insights and a willingness to share them, so regardless of the programming community you belong to, just let it be known that you'd like a book on effective use of the technology, and there's a reasonable chance that somebody will step forward to create it. For anybody who's thinking of stepping forward, feel free to write to me, and I'll happily put you in contact with editors who I think might be interested in working with you.

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  68. As someone you once set up at a seminar on double-lock race conditions to ask a question that you promptly replied: "And here is the naive programmer thinking that clear statements trump the compiler writer's whims"...you will be missed you pompous, brilliant fiend!

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  69. Thanks for your contribution Scott, you sure will be missed...

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  70. So long Scott! Wish you all the best on your future `deferred` tasks.

    Some of your works (literatures to be more precise) have had more effect on C++ programmers than you might like to think. Thank you for that :)

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  71. So sorry and sad to hear that you wont be as active - especially now that the world of C++ is so exciting again. Your materials are always so clear and readable that I feel a twinge of concern that we are losing one of the best 'explainers' in the world.

    Thank you for all your hard work - your books are classics.

    And please, if you do get bored, 'Effective C++17' would be so excellent :-).

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  72. You'd have to admit that if there's a language that keeps a "scholar" busy studying & learning after 25 years, that's C++ (and ancient Greek & Latin). Hope you'll dive into Open Source development and I wish you good times with your new endeavors.

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  73. Thank you sir, programming community owe your for your book Effective C++

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  74. Thank you for your contribution to the C++ community!
    I am just guessing that your finishing of handling user feedback from the recent book(including subsequent break/holidays) coincided with the new year... perfect circumstances to start a new... ;) anyway, good luck!

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  75. Thanks for all your work Scott - your books have inspired me to learn C++ and hopefully become a better programmer - and I know many people who share the same opinion - I've been through some C++ interviews where questions were based solely on the chapters from your books! Having had a chance to attend your training, I must admit, you changed my attitude not only to the way I program but to the way I work - I was infected by your passion and am endlessly grateful to you for that.

    Thank you. You will be missed!

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  76. You will live on, as an emoji in our companies slack chat. Thanks for all the great books over the years.

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  78. What a shock! I get this weird feeling of loss and emptiness. It's like the view from Aristeia suddenly got all cloudy and gloomy...

    While it is true that C++ has made a return to the spotlight in the last few years, few of its leading experts have the same kind of communication skills that you've shown in your publications and presentations. Those skills have helped many developers become significantly better C++ programmers.

    Another aspect I've always admired about your approach is how you've always cared about simplicity and consistency. I recall a post from last year, where you discussed C++'s plentiful ways of initializing variables, the inconsistency issues with std::initializer_list and constructors etc. It's like I used to see you as some sort of "caretaker" for C++. Maybe it's because the kind of inconsistency that bothered you also bothered me, so it was good knowing there was someone of relevance pointing those out. :)

    Anyway, I really hope you find realization and fulfillment in whatever you are going to devote yourself to, going forward. Thank you very much for all your contributions. C++, as a language and as a community, owes you big.

    Thanks, Scott.

    Sincerely

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  79. Hi Scott sir,

    I truly believe you won't be able to leave C++/programming, since one can't leave behind his first love.

    Sir I really really hope you take back your decision in the way that at least you would be active from time to time, providing amazing articles, teaching noobies like me and others.


    I recently started reading your effective C++, and I truly love your way of teaching. I can't imagine the C++ world without you, simple as that.

    If you like I can come and protest in front of your door, to persuade you in to not doing it.

    Regards and love
    Anonymous :)

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  80. Sad to see you going, but happy for you, and all the comments saluting you and your work.

    Thanks for everything, and good luck for your next projects.

    (... still hope to see future presentations on C++ from you, for nostalgia's and englightened outsider's viewpoint sake... Something like: "I dreamed it, and now it's here" or "WTF are you doing with that feature?")

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  81. This is pure speculation, so take it with a pinch of salt. Or lots.

    Having seen Scotts talk at the D conference, and the related blog post, I can't say I'm surprised. I've never felt more depressed about C++, than after that talk, and I got the distinct feeling that the proverbial Camel's Back wasn't doing so well. That coupled with the way Effective C++11/14 ended up, that is, with an entire chapter devoted to type deduction, which was originally not even supposed to be in the book, made me kind of expect this retirement. Please do not take this the wrong way, it is not a critique of the writing, only the facts. My interest in learning newer C++ stopped dead in the first chapter; type deduction. I don't want to know multiple sets of typing rules, all with their own quirks. Don't get me wrong, lambdas and smart pointers are fine, but the level of detailed - excuse my french - pissing about, that type deduction requires just doesn't seem like a good development for the language. I've always been pessimistic about the future of C++. Reappropriating 'auto' was a high point, but I doubt we'll see anything like that happen again, and with Scott leaving, things look even more shakey.

    Thank you for all your contributions. They are most certainly appreciated.

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  82. Definitely a great loss in C++ community, we lost a great leader and professional tutor!

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  83. As owner of the C++ community on Google Plus and a fan of your books, I wish you well and thank you for your immeasurable contributions to the world.

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  84. Your books and talks on C++ has influenced lot of people to understand the language basics and tricks properly. Thank you so much for your contribution to C++.

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  85. A sad day for the C++ community. As a C++ developer I have benefited greatly from your books and talks, I am sure that many have too.

    All the best for whatever you do next and hope you come back to C++ land occasionally.

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  86. Oh no....
    I've loved your books and learned a HUGE amount of stuff from your work.
    Thank you very much for this wonderful time.

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  87. A sad loss to the community. You have inspired me and I am sure may others to do things properly.
    As for the hair, I wish I had some.

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  88. No... Best wishes to your future!
    I have sent email to serveral c++ book authors to ask questions in their book in the past. You are the only one who replied and answered me. I really appreciate it. Thank you, Scott!!

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  89. I feel like an old friend is leaving my neighborhood. That said, I'm actually exploring a new neighborhood as well. Maybe you could visit there with me. I've been teaching myself Haskell for the last 2 months. There's some stuff out there, but I can't find anything that has the Meyers touch. May I humbly suggest that you could offer a lot to the Haskell neighborhood.

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  90. Thank you Scott for teaching the world how to write c++ - and cultivating a younger generation (like Herb) to carry on. Your voice will be missed.

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  91. Seriously, you should start selling Scott wigs.

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  92. Great Scott! :) What a brilliant idea. I'd so but one if it was priced say $15.

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  93. Thx Scott, I learned a lot from all your books, you will be missed. Enjoy your new adventures!

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  94. Hello Scott,

    Considering that I have only recently, in the last 10th months or so, started to keep an eye on your blog, hence I do not have the requisite data to presume that you start your every new year by trying to shock your readers. However, if you definitely, certainly, categorically, undoubtedly, unquestionably, and finally, decidedly plan to follow through on your statement, then I can only declare it a sad day.

    With that said, approximately a decade and a half ago, I benefitted greatly from your first two books in the Effective C++ series. As an individual planning to make a return to the C++ world within the next 12 months or so, I have high hopes that another reading would certainly assist in rediscovering the recesses considered the preserve of the erudite few.

    With the hope that you would enjoy the future engagements and the rest of the journey,

    Irfan.

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  95. something ends, something begins... i hope you'll share what will you be working on next, soon! :)

    thank you for all the time you invested in spreading C++ knowledge. you changed lives of many programmers world wide. definitely something to be proud of!

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  96. Effective C++ was the first C++ book I bought that wasn't required reading in a course. Your books, website, and talks have continued to help me through out my career. Thank you!

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  97. "I may even give one more talk. (A potential conference appearance has been in the works for a while. If it gets scheduled, I'll let you know.)"

    Any chance that this potential conference appearance is C++ and Beyond 2016????? Please? It's been more than 2 years, I'm missing the front row seats to you, Scott, and Andrei destroying each other!!!

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  98. Thanks for your support and good luck!

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  99. Thanks so much for all your excellent books and posts. They've helped me over my career and it's sad to see you go.... but I'm sure you'll have fun with your TODO list :) Best for the future!

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  100. Thanks for everything and best of luck!

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  101. std::cout << "Thank you!" << std::endl;

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  102. Thank you for the wonderful oeuvre, Scott. Best wishes.

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  103. Goodbye and thanks for all the books!

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  104. It was a pleasure to me to talk and listen to you during at least two "classes" and on several videos! Have fun on your new priorities!

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  105. Thank you for everything. Best luck with what's next.

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  106. Ewoud Van CraeynestJanuary 8, 2016 at 12:30 AM

    It was a pleasure to read your material and watch the recordings of your conference talks!
    I must admin that I was already looking forward to EffectiveC++17 (for lack of a known title).

    I wish you lots of success with your future endeavours ...

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  107. Thank you Scott for the great presentations you've given; I've enjoyed watching them on the YouTubes.

    Cheers

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  108. Thanks for everything!

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  109. Damn!

    And thank you.

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  110. You have single handedly helped scores of curious developers to appreciate and handle C++ well. Your insightful and intriguing articles will be missed. Wishing you well Mr Meyers.

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  111. You'll be missed in the development community! I watched your online videos more times than i can remember.

    It's good to see the excellent writing style continue with the effective series. Just got my hands on effective python and it's a delight.

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  112. Enjoy your time Scott and many thanks for everything.

    Happy Effective Retirement++16!

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  113. I've so enjoyed your amazing books and excellent inspiring talks!

    Thank you your hard work and for everything you have done! Good luck on what you will do next!

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  114. Hi, Scott. I am the guy from this photo - http://cs616627.vk.me/v616627574/10dd9/LZDTeLXsm0w.jpg. It was taken in Moscow in 2014 during your three days course in Yandex.

    Thank you very much for your books, conference talks and articles. Your are the best in explaining complicated things and I treat you as one of my teachers in programming.

    I wish you all the best, enjoy your time and be happy!

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  115. I understand your decision of retiring from the C++ community. Good luck for the next !

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  116. As a long-standing follower of Scott and his books [some of which I bought] I always found some detachment from certain language decisions. I feel that Scott is an Academician in the good sense and skewness of orthogonality becomes very uncomfortable for him. In the version of Effective C++ I bought (for C++03), descriptions of the duplication of copy constructor/assignment, the intricate swap, etc are clear indications of discomfort. More recently, the consequences of Rvalue references and auto were described at length. Around here, auto was never considered reasonable. There is more to it, I am certain. Bjarne was not very polite in CppCon 2015. And features are still being added to the syntax (!).

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  117. Thanks Scott, I've been a fan since it seems the 80's? Is that possible? If not, it sure seems that long. Enjoy catching up on your bucket list.

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  118. auto too=[](){ cout <<"thank you, I wish for the best for your future..";}

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  119. I'll miss your gift of being able to explain the complexities of C++ in simple enough language that I could understand. Thanks for that, and best of luck wherever you goto.

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  120. I remember some 10 years ago when I had just graduated from college and soon after got my first job as a C++ programmer. My confidence in my C++ skills and my ego were so big that on every job application I said that I had expert knowledge of C++. The interviewer in the company that hired me even laughed a little when he read that, but ultimately decided to hire and mentor me. One of the first tasks that he gave me was to read Effective C++ from the company's library. So I read it. And my head was filled with doubt and confusion. What the hell was this author talking about? He obviously has no clue about anything, let alone C++. So I read the book the second time. And the third time. And, oh boy, did I feel humbled after I started understanding it. At that point it became clear why the interviewer laughed. Anyway, it turned out that every time I read a book from the Effective C++ series, it felt like I had to re-edit my knowledge of C++ in the resume if I wanted to be taken seriously.

    Thank you Scott for all the great work you have done, and best of luck in your future endeavors.

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  121. Thank you for your work on C++, I wish you all the best for the future!

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  122. Y si gustas, déjanos saber dónde está ahora toda esa energía.

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  123. Thank you Scott for all of your work! I have been teaching myself C++ since it was at 4.0 and still have only scratched the surfaces. I downloaded a pdf of your paper on "Dimensional Analysis in C++", as I have a strong interest in Chemistry and Physics, and was getting frustrated between the units of the concept and the definition and uses thereof, in various GUI applications in my favorite areas of study. I used the code from the paper and wrote my own SIUnits class template that expands it a little, yet it compiles great and as I write in the CPP file, using MSVS 15, the red squiggles let me know when the concepts, as defined, are being misused. I now have a hundred pages of source code that uses:

    template
    class SIUnits .... the 8th place is for particle, which makes it work for even more concepts like catalytic activity, or radio activity, and I will eventually be using it with a particle system to better define the actions of GUI electrons, protons, etc. Thanks again!

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  124. Scott, your writings deeply impacted the way I wrote software programs not just in C++ but also in other languages coz some of the stuff was quite reusable across technologies. I want to thank you for all your great work and amazing books! May God bless you!

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  125. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

    Mark Twain

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  126. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

    Mark Twain

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  127. I just wanted to say thank you for your books, your wonderful talks and I deeply regret that I was never able to see you live.

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  128. Thank you for your great books, I loved to read them! :-)

    Hope Darla is well!

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  129. thank you very much for your books about C++ . I wish that you will have an effective life in the next. best wishes

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  130. Hey, I'm pretty sure everyone has already said what you should be said, so I just want to say best of luck in your future endeavors!

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